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Does anybody have a working parking brake? How? (Read 14055 times)
Reply #15 - Dec 4th, 2012 at 10:05am

Artsvettes   Offline
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Back in the day a local junkyard sold brakes shoes new drums and resurfaced old ones. When he finished resurface he had a machine that he put the shoes on to surface match the drums then champher the ends of the shoes to break down the square edge on the shoe. I think this had to do with quick seating of shoe to drum. But I also think it reduced the chance of cracking. I have seen this more times than not on corvette p/b shoes, especially riveted shoes. But that still doesn't solve the problem of a piss poor design by the general.
  In jersey I remember guys tighten up the adjustment and hoped for the best. The better way would have been to use a caliper that has a built in park brake.But the engineers blew the budget when they designed the IRS and the brake system failed horribly because of it.  The BOP and cadillac used them n the eighties, and late model Mustang uses that type system. Now that these cars see little use and most don't see any inspections. It wouldn't be very cost effective to try and come up with caliper/ pb system. Unless you came up with one with over the counter parts Roll Eyes  ...........jack
 

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Reply #16 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 7:43am

Gary Cook L82-1977   Offline
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The people from Carbinite returned my message.  This harder than steel coating will increase friction between the drum and shoes.  They said they've done something like this before for the military. 

I'm shipping two new rotors to them so they can apply the coating to the inside drum.  Cost is about $7.00/square inch.  He said he would turn it around in a day but I told him to take his time.  Not a rush.  I've waited 6 years already!

Keeping my fingers crossed.  This could be the ultimate parking brake fix.  With all the back and forth shipping plus holiday delays I probably won't get an opportunity to install them until the end of the month.

Stay tuned for updates. 
 
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Reply #17 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 8:42am

Gary Cook L82-1977   Offline
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Jack.

I tried the adjustment.  It is cranked to the max.  It is so tight now you can feel the drag when you move the car! 

If you take a new brake shoe and check how it fits in a new rotor, you'll see a huge gap.  I don't see how it could ever wear into place.  I've tried all kinds of shoes and they fit the same.  I thought it was the rotor possibly being ground too much.  The new ones are the same.  I did the grinding trick.  I used to do that back in my mechanic days when just about every car had drum brakes.   

Just a piss poor design.  I'm hoping to compensate for it with increased friction.
 
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Reply #18 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 11:56am
blue 77   Ex Member

 
Gary Cook L82-1977 wrote on Dec 5th, 2012 at 8:42am:
Just a piss poor design.

Gary, I think you've nailed the problem.

Dale
 
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Reply #19 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 12:05pm

Gary Cook L82-1977   Offline
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Isn't it amazing that this problem existed for so long?   Shocked

Don't you think that some executive from GM would notice the problem while driving their new Corvette company car?  At least once between 1965 and 1982?  Or that the guys driving them off the assembly line would say something?  You've got to wonder what would have been considered a failure.  Things were certainly different back then.
 
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Reply #20 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 12:35pm
blue 77   Ex Member

 
Probably thought "What the H*LL",  why worry about it if consumers keep buying them and not complaining.  I know when I noticed mine and mentioned it to the dealer, they said "that's just the way it is."

Dale
« Last Edit: Dec 5th, 2012 at 12:37pm by N/A »  
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Reply #21 - Dec 5th, 2012 at 1:06pm
TX 73 stock   Ex Member

 
yeah, they were not made so you can grab it and do a 180. not even in the rain which is a lot of fun. just supposed to keep the car from rolling from a dead stop. however, if you have it parked on a hill and you get bumped, you'd think it would at least slow it back down. is it really that bad?

Charlie
 
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Reply #22 - Dec 27th, 2012 at 2:04pm

olddiver   Offline
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I was just thinking ( got a headache  Angry ) has anyone tried one of those line- lock systems? Just throwing that out there.
....Mark
 

Upon the plains of hesitation bleach the bones of countless millions who on the threshold of victory they sat down to rest, and resting they died.
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Reply #23 - Dec 27th, 2012 at 2:37pm

68-73   Offline
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Line lock would work on the frt or rear breaks, but I don't think it would be a good idea to keep pressure on your break lines for a long period. It's a bad idea & the only thing that seems to work is applying more pull than you can achieve on the hand break. This is why the linear  actuator works, it pulls 200lbs of pressure.
Alan Smiley
 
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Reply #24 - Dec 27th, 2012 at 4:47pm

olddiver   Offline
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Thanks Alan,
Didn't know if it would work or not. It will be awhile Embarrassed before its back on the road and I'm sure I'll have to deal with this. Just trying to prepare. Thanks for the input!
....Mark
 

Upon the plains of hesitation bleach the bones of countless millions who on the threshold of victory they sat down to rest, and resting they died.
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Reply #25 - Dec 28th, 2012 at 6:04am
TX 73 stock   Ex Member

 
I haven't looked into this but I wonder if there's enough room to install an offset pully that could increase the handle pull power. sure you would loose some range but it seems there's plenty of handle movement to account for increased leverage.

Charlie
 
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Reply #26 - Jan 3rd, 2013 at 6:59am

Gary Cook L82-1977   Offline
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Mission Viejo, CA

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Charlie.. 

I don't think a larger or offset pulley would help.  I've cranked down the shoes to where they rub and tightened the cables to the max.  That leaves at least 1/2 the travel in the handle when pulled to the max.  Also on mine I've replaced the 4 speed with a 5 speed.  It's pretty close to the pulley.

Still waiting on my updated rotors.  They should be about finished with the work.

P.S.  Yes.  The parking brake is that bad.  Mine won't hold on a 10 degree or more incline.  It also won't stop the car moving forward unless you have a 1/4 mile!  Funny thing is that it does hold pretty good in reverse.  I'd say it is completely acceptable.  Does anybody else see that?  That leads to why would it be better in reverse than forward?  Same size shoe front/rear.  Mechanism is basically center pull.

« Last Edit: Jan 3rd, 2013 at 7:04am by Gary Cook L82-1977 »  
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Reply #27 - Jan 3rd, 2013 at 8:43am
TX 73 stock   Ex Member

 
I've owned my fair share of auto's and standards and the rule of thumb I learned is if you have a standard then you always set the e-brake. I think it works better in reverse because of weight transfer. same rule applies to power pulling. for a front wheel drive, you want to pull from the front in reverse and for rear wheel, you want to pull from the rear in forward gear.

Charlie
 
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Reply #28 - Jan 4th, 2013 at 11:48am
blue 77   Ex Member

 
Gary Cook L82-1977 wrote on Jan 3rd, 2013 at 6:59am:
Funny thing is that it does hold pretty good in reverse.  I'd say it is completely acceptable.  Does anybody else see that?

Been so long since I actually used mine I can't remember for sure, Embarrassed but I do think it held better in reverse also. Undecided  Know it didn't hold in any forward gear. Wink

Dale
 
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Reply #29 - Jan 5th, 2013 at 5:22am

VETTE 1977   Offline
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I'm in the same boat Dale. Don't know if it even works now but when it did, it was better in reverse than in any forward gear. My trick at the Corvette shows when they checked the operation of the "E" brake was to put it in reverse and let the clutch out very slowly just to lug the engine down. Up here anyway they wanted it to be done in a forward gear. It worked every time.

Dave
 

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