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Trailing arms (Read 2315 times)
Dec 19th, 2014 at 5:32am
seventyate   Ex Member

 
Haven't been on here for some time, but I have a question, that I think Jack can answer.  I recently replaced the trailing arms on my 76, when I took them out they had shims on both sides of the arms that were enough to fill the gaps and keep the arm from shifting from side to side. 
I am now replacing them on my 78 because of bad bushings and hearing a clunk when I stepped on it and then another clunk when I hit the brakes.  When I removed the one on the passenger side, the inboard side was full of shims but the outboard side only had one.  Shouldn't there be enough shims in there to prevent sideways moment of the arm on the bolt where the bushing is???  This is the only one that was like that and that is where the clunk was at.
Ed
 
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Reply #1 - Dec 19th, 2014 at 6:24am

68-73   Offline
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The shims are there for alignment & need to be always put back in the same order they were originally set at the factory. Unless the car was hit it should never change. If one or more fell out you will have to go to a good alignment shop & have the rear aligned. The clunk sound could be a lot of things but I would guess it's the trailing arm bushing is worn out. Always replace the shims with stainless steel shims.
Alan Smiley
 
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Reply #2 - Dec 19th, 2014 at 6:52am
seventyate   Ex Member

 
Alan, I know the shims are for alignment, had to replace the arms on my 76 put all new shims in it and took it to the garage for both front end and rear end alignment.  Very good garage in our area with old school mechanics and the alignment guy has done several of these C3's in his day.  Said he had to align the front end to be sure that was true because you align the rear to the front.   
My question is,  inside the frame where the bushing end goes in and then you put the bolt in when you put shims back in shouldn't you fill both sides of the bushing area to prevent sideways movement on the bolt.   
When I took the passenger side off, there was only one shim on the right hand side and I think whoever put that are in, one of the PO's, didn't do it right. Nothing fell out as the cotter pins were in place to lock the shims in.   
When I get these arms rebuilt, I will be getting new SS Shims, Cotter pin and new bolts.
Thanks
Ed
This is my second set of trailing arms job in a couple months.
 
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Reply #3 - Dec 19th, 2014 at 7:14am

68-73   Offline
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It should be no play in there so the trailing arm can't move side to side. It should have shims filling all the space on both sides.
Alan Smiley
 
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Reply #4 - Dec 19th, 2014 at 7:40am
seventyate   Ex Member

 
Thanks,  when I put them back in I will fill the area and go directly to the alignment shop.  Not knowing what should be on each side I will just even them out.  Only about a 4 mile ride to the shop.
Ed
 
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Reply #5 - Dec 19th, 2014 at 10:06am

Artsvettes   Offline
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The shims are used to set the rear toe-in. Like Alan said no side movement. Just make sure you tell the alignment what you found.....jack
 

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Reply #6 - Dec 22nd, 2014 at 2:30pm
seventyate   Ex Member

 
I was lucky, the parts guy "GEE's Vette's" was coming my way and picked up the trailing arms on Saturday.  He had parts to deliver in my neighborhood.  He is about 150 miles from my house so all I'll have to do is go and pick them up when done.  He said he should have them done in about a week or so. This is the second set he is doing for me and he did a set for Gil.
Both of us happy with his work.
Ed
 
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Reply #7 - Jan 21st, 2015 at 10:14am
seventyate   Ex Member

 
Newly rebuilt trailing arms are here.  My parts guy was coming back this way and dropped them off.  Now a little warm weather and they will be in. 
Ed
 
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Reply #8 - Jan 23rd, 2015 at 6:14am

yellowjacket   Offline
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It has been probably six years since I did mine on yellowjacket along the the full VBP suspension. I forgot most of how I did it, but Alan and the "other" Jack covered it pretty well. Buried on this forum was the complete install of everything I did.
 

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Reply #9 - Jan 23rd, 2015 at 7:09am

68-73   Offline
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I remember one trick I learned. After you have got the trailing arm in (attached to the frame & the shims installed) put a 5/16" socket under the trailing arm between the trailing arm & frame. This gets the arm in a more horizontal position so it's easier to attach everything without jacking up the arm which would be in the way.   Good luck on the install.
Alan Smiley
 
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Reply #10 - Jan 23rd, 2015 at 7:13am
seventyate   Ex Member

 
This is my second set, I did my 76 a few months back.  When I did that one, I replaced the shims just as they were when I took them out.  Then took it in for alignment.  There were enough shims there on either side of the bushing to keep the end from shifting from side to side.    When I took the 78 apart, apparently either somebody forget or did not put enough shims in on the one side or they rotted and fell out.   This allowed the end of the arm to start to wobble and wear, It was in rough shape.  If I hit the gas a little I would hear a clunk and when I hit the brake pretty good I heard another clunk.  Having just put a rebuilt rear in it and all new "U" joints in all the shafts my only conclusion was trailing arm bushing and I was right.  So now to just get them back in and see what happens. 
Ed
 
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Reply #11 - Jan 23rd, 2015 at 4:32pm

olddiver   Offline
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Ed
Good luck and hope you don't have any more issues with the rear end Smiley
....Mark
 

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